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Indicators & Change Ideas

Are you looking to improve the issues facing today’s health care system?

 

Explore the quality indicators being tracked by health care organizations in Ontario through Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) and change ideas to help improve them. Connect with others to share your experiences and ideas of your own.

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Percentage of LTC residents not living with psychosis who were given antipsychotic medication

For residents of Ontario’s long-term care homes, antipsychotic medications may play an important role in managing the behavioural symptoms that sometimes occur with psychosis or dementia, such as agitation and aggression. But the use of these medications has sparked controversy across the province, the country and around the world because of side effects such as sedation, higher risk of falls and slightly increased risk of death. Family members of long-term care home residents may also see their loved ones struggling to communicate or sleeping for large parts of the day as a result of antipsychotic medication use. However, without the medications, some residents and their families may suffer because of behaviours that put them or others at risk.

Change Ideas

Identify improvement efforts planned or underway, including what resources and supports are available

  • Review the quality standard Behavioural Symptoms of Dementia
    Ontario Health Quality Standards
  • Explore opportunities to work with the home’s behavioural response team and champions
  • Consult with external teams, such as psychogeriatric resource consultants, seniors’ mental health services, and Behavioural Supports Ontario

Verify current resident data

  • Review the data from your home and pharmacy provider (indications, new starts, summary of responsive behaviours, interventions)
  • Sign up for long-term care practice reports for data and change ideas to reduce prescribing for antipsychotic medications
    MyPractice: Long-Term Care
  • Verify the data on the number of residents prescribed antipsychotics, including new starts, PRNs, and administration rates
  • Request a medication-tracking tool from your pharmacist

Improve medication review process

Update and implement individualized behaviour care plans

Choose optimal pharmacological interventions

Learn from your peers

Percentage of LTC residents not living with psychosis who were given antipsychotic medication

For residents of Ontario’s long-term care homes, antipsychotic medications may play an important role in managing the behavioural symptoms that sometimes occur with psychosis or dementia, such as agitation and aggression. But the use of these medications has sparked controversy across the province, the country and around the world because of side effects such as sedation, higher risk of falls and slightly increased risk of death. Family members of long-term care home residents may also see their loved ones struggling to communicate or sleeping for large parts of the day as a result of antipsychotic medication use. However, without the medications, some residents and their families may suffer because of behaviours that put them or others at risk.

Change Ideas

Identify improvement efforts planned or underway, including what resources and supports are available

  • Review the quality standard Behavioural Symptoms of Dementia
    Ontario Health Quality Standards
  • Explore opportunities to work with the home’s behavioural response team and champions
  • Consult with external teams, such as psychogeriatric resource consultants, seniors’ mental health services, and Behavioural Supports Ontario

Verify current resident data

  • Review the data from your home and pharmacy provider (indications, new starts, summary of responsive behaviours, interventions)
  • Sign up for long-term care practice reports for data and change ideas to reduce prescribing for antipsychotic medications
    MyPractice: Long-Term Care
  • Verify the data on the number of residents prescribed antipsychotics, including new starts, PRNs, and administration rates
  • Request a medication-tracking tool from your pharmacist

Improve medication review process

Update and implement individualized behaviour care plans

Choose optimal pharmacological interventions

Learn from your peers