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Indicators & Change Ideas

Are you looking to improve the issues facing today’s health care system?

 

Explore the quality indicators being tracked by health care organizations in Ontario through Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) and change ideas to help improve them. Connect with others to share your experiences and ideas of your own.

Looking for more help with your QIP? Review our guidance materials on the QIP Guidance page, or check out the QIP Support and Training page to access webinars, help sessions, videos, and more.

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Wait time to long-term care home placement

Delayed admission to a long-term care home can result in health complications for people waiting, as well as create stress for them, family members and other caregivers. If people are waiting in hospital when they could be in a long-term care home, it may affect the hospital’s ability to provide services to other patients who require hospital care.

Wait time to long-term care home placement is measured using both wait time in the community and wait time in acute care.

Visit Health Quality Ontario’s Indicator Library to view how to measure:

Key resources

Many of these change ideas are drawn from the Auditor General’s reports on the long-term care home placement process:

Change Ideas

  • Use an advanced care planning approach and guide potential applicants through exploring alternatives prior to applying to long-term care
    Process measure: Percent of applicants who have done advanced care planning
  • Ensure continued eligibility of all applicants on waitlist through reassessments
    Process measure: Percent of applicants who undergo reassessment after a change in health status (such as a hospitalization)
  • Follow a consistent process to rank people within the crisis priority levels
    Process measure: Percent of long-term care home applicants designated as a crisis priority that meet the legislated crisis priority eligibility criteria
  • Increase advanced skill sets in long-term care homes so that more homes can accommodate the needs of more potential applicants, including how to manage specialty care such as responsive behaviours, mental health conditions, intravenous therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and feeding tubes
    Process measure: Percent of applicants declined from wait list due to a home being unable to provide specialty care
    Process measure: Percentage of homes that have admission policies for residents with responsive behaviours, mental health conditions, intravenous therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and feeding tubes
    Long-Term Care Best Practices Program by the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario
    The Value-added Benefit of Nurse Practitioners in Long-Term Care Settings: Increased Nursing Staff’s Ability to Care for Residents
  • Encourage homes to support equitable and culturally appropriate care to accommodate the needs of more potential applicants
    Process measure: Percentage of homes that have an equity policy in place

Wait time to long-term care home placement

Delayed admission to a long-term care home can result in health complications for people waiting, as well as create stress for them, family members and other caregivers. If people are waiting in hospital when they could be in a long-term care home, it may affect the hospital’s ability to provide services to other patients who require hospital care.

Wait time to long-term care home placement is measured using both wait time in the community and wait time in acute care.

Visit Health Quality Ontario’s Indicator Library to view how to measure:

Key resources

Many of these change ideas are drawn from the Auditor General’s reports on the long-term care home placement process:

Change Ideas

  • Use an advanced care planning approach and guide potential applicants through exploring alternatives prior to applying to long-term care
    Process measure: Percent of applicants who have done advanced care planning
  • Ensure continued eligibility of all applicants on waitlist through reassessments
    Process measure: Percent of applicants who undergo reassessment after a change in health status (such as a hospitalization)
  • Follow a consistent process to rank people within the crisis priority levels
    Process measure: Percent of long-term care home applicants designated as a crisis priority that meet the legislated crisis priority eligibility criteria
  • Increase advanced skill sets in long-term care homes so that more homes can accommodate the needs of more potential applicants, including how to manage specialty care such as responsive behaviours, mental health conditions, intravenous therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and feeding tubes
    Process measure: Percent of applicants declined from wait list due to a home being unable to provide specialty care
    Process measure: Percentage of homes that have admission policies for residents with responsive behaviours, mental health conditions, intravenous therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and feeding tubes
    Long-Term Care Best Practices Program by the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario
    The Value-added Benefit of Nurse Practitioners in Long-Term Care Settings: Increased Nursing Staff’s Ability to Care for Residents
  • Encourage homes to support equitable and culturally appropriate care to accommodate the needs of more potential applicants
    Process measure: Percentage of homes that have an equity policy in place