Posts

Indicators & Change Ideas

Are you looking to improve the issues facing today’s health care system?

 

Explore the quality indicators being tracked by health care organizations in Ontario through Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) and change ideas to help improve them. Connect with others to share your experiences and ideas of your own.

  • 0
  • 586

Percentage of LTC residents who fell in the last 30 days

Falls have immediate physical consequences (including injuries) and represent one of the leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions among older adults in Canada. For older adults, falls can be a significant turning point toward frailty and overall health decline. For an individual, it can mean the beginning of a loss of independence and a serious deterioration in quality of life. Furthermore, fall-related injuries exact a high cost to the province’s health care system.

Key resources

Change Ideas

Assess and manage fall risk in residents

Implement universal fall precautions

  • Conduct ongoing surveillance of resident spaces to promptly clean up environmental hazards like clutter, spills, and trip hazards
    Components and Example of Universal Falls Precautions by RNAO
  • Implement tools and equipment that can help reduce the risk of falling, including low-profile beds, monitors and alarms, and grab bars

Follow best-practice rehabilitation care pathways

Learn from your peers

  • Learn from a community of people who inform, share ideas, and support each other to improve the implementation of evidence-informed fall prevention practices
    Fall Prevention Community of Practice: LOOP
  • The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) has released a course on Preventing Falls in Long-Term Care

Percentage of LTC residents who fell in the last 30 days

Falls have immediate physical consequences (including injuries) and represent one of the leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions among older adults in Canada. For older adults, falls can be a significant turning point toward frailty and overall health decline. For an individual, it can mean the beginning of a loss of independence and a serious deterioration in quality of life. Furthermore, fall-related injuries exact a high cost to the province’s health care system.

Key resources

Change Ideas

Assess and manage fall risk in residents

Implement universal fall precautions

  • Conduct ongoing surveillance of resident spaces to promptly clean up environmental hazards like clutter, spills, and trip hazards
    Components and Example of Universal Falls Precautions by RNAO
  • Implement tools and equipment that can help reduce the risk of falling, including low-profile beds, monitors and alarms, and grab bars

Follow best-practice rehabilitation care pathways

Learn from your peers

  • Learn from a community of people who inform, share ideas, and support each other to improve the implementation of evidence-informed fall prevention practices
    Fall Prevention Community of Practice: LOOP
  • The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) has released a course on Preventing Falls in Long-Term Care